Dunbartonshire
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Dunbartonshire

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Dunbartonshire played a prominent part in Scotland's early history as the ancient Kingdom of Strathclyde, which existed for nearly 1000 years between the Roman occupation of Britain and the end of the first millennium, had its main stronghold on Dumbarton Rock.  This 240 ft. basalt "plug" dominates the Firth of Clyde and was originally known as Dun Breatann, the fort of the Britons.    By the 9th century Strathclyde was largely subservient to the Scottish monarchy, and by the 11th century it was fully incorporated into the realm of Scotland following the death of its last king, Owen the Bald.

Dumbarton Rock and its castle, however, retained their importance (and in case you're wondering, no, that's not a spelling mistake; curiously, Dunbarton the county is spelled with an "n", while Dumbarton the town has an "m").    Here it was that Sir John Menteith ("fause Menteith") held William Wallace before delivering him to the English and execution in 1305.  However, although a royal castle, its ownership was frequently disputed by the Crown and the often rebellious Earls of Lennox, and in 1489 James IV besieged the castle twice to oust Lennox and then used it as a base in his war against the Lord of the Isles.   In 1547 Mary Queen of Scots, then a child, sheltered here for several months before leaving for France, and subsequently the castle held out for Mary longer than anywhere except Edinburgh Castle.

The county has some of Scotland's most beautiful scenery, with Loch Lomond on its east and the Firth of Clyde on the west and south.  The area near Glasgow, however, became heavily industrialised and it was in Clydebank that the famous John Browns Shipyard built so many great ocean liners including the "Lusitania", "Queen Mary", "Queen Elizabeth", and "Queen Elizabeth II".   Alexandria, just to the south of Loch Lomond, could have become Scotland's own version of Detroit as in 1906 the Argyll motorcar factory, a true industrial palace, opened in the town and at one stage its car output was the highest in Europe. 

Family names associated with the county include Lennox, Colquhoun, Stewart, Buchanan, MacFarlane, Campbell, MacAulay and Fleming.

Our kit of Dunbartonshire (which of course includes the unique detached portion with Kirkintilloch and Cumbernauld) has a stich count of 199 x 152 and, when stitched on the supplied 27-count Linda evenweave, measures 15 x 13 inches (380 x 335 mm).  There are 19 buildings, a crane, sailing boat, place names, compass and crest, and  30 shades of Anchor stranded cotton are included.

Kit 24.65 UK pounds
Chartpack 11.75 UK pounds




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